Apollo research
image

 

Apollo Investigation

Dust-to-Dust

Test generates much dust

Has NASA stepped on it's own foot with the 7,500 LOX/Methane engine demo by not clearing the area of loose dust and debris before ignition?

nasa 7500 lb test

nasa 7500 lb test

nasa 7500 lb test

click here to see video
NASA has recently released a video of the test firing of a 7,500 lb thrust LOX/Methane rocket engine. This new NASA test inadvertently demonstrates the effect of a 7,500-lb thrust engine on dust and dirt, a stark comparison to the claimed effect the 10,500-lb thrust Hydrazine engine had during the Apollo 11 landing.

The Apollo LM engine operated automatically at 10% throttle (1,050lbs) thrust for 15 seconds during descent orbital insertion (DOI) then 40% (4,200lbs) thrust for 15 more seconds for computer orientation.

Dietrich von Schmausen* has pointed out that as the LM descended it reduced its thrust from 9,800 lbs to approx 7,000 lbs for three minutes, then down to approx 2,600 lbs. As seen in the above photos/video link, and considering what a 7,500-lb engine will do to loose material on the surface, Dietrich von Schmausen considers that a vertical 2,600-lb thrust plume at several feet should do far more than just ‘waft’ the surface.

During the Apollo missions the LM approached and landed at a descending angle, and not straight down. The descent engine had sufficient energy to raise dust at 100 feet, and dust kick up from the LM engine was commented on by the Apollo crew at 40 feet. Deep dust was present near and around the landing site.

Mr von Schmausen says the lander was approaching the target at a 16-degree angle with a decent rate of 60 feet per second forward to 16 fps down from an altitude of 500 feet. Descending from 100 feet at that rate the dust disturbance markings would have become increasingly deeper for the last 100 feet to the landing site. He calculates that there should have been a blast trench at least 32 feet long.

Yet, no such landing approach trail was ever photographed or discussed. The LM would have left not only a visible crater (if not actually wiping the area clear) but also a visible trail approaching the landing site. In Dietrich von Schmausen's view if this did not occur, then the down-looking video showing dust movement at forty feet was totally fake.

Mr von Schmausen says the test-firing platform for the LOX/Methane rocket engine is similar to those used at Rocketdyne during the time Bill Kaysing worked there. During the Rocketdyne test firings one could witness large volumes of exhaust gasses but would not see the effects of the exhaust plume on the ‘target’ surface.

Notwithstanding any effects on the target from the heat of the engine, an exhaust plume of this magnitude would also disturb then redistribute any loose surface materials such as sand, dirt or dust. But because the Rocketdyne test rig had a sterile surface, such effects did not occur.

Recall Aldrin’s comments during Apollo 11 landing: “40 feet, down 2 1/2. Picking up some dust". The camera showed moving dust at an altitude of 40 or more feet, which demonstrated that the thrust plume from the LM decent engine was not dispersing laterally into a vacuum.

Mr von Schmausen’s opinion is that a goodly portion of the Apollo mission footage was manufactured for promotional and political purposes and once everyone involved in Apollo has died, someone will reveal that the Moon missions were all robotic.

Mr von Schmausen speculates that the so-called ‘Apollo conspiracy’ was ultimately the benevolent application of the generally noxious idea that the “end justified the means”. In his view this time it truly did, for the failure of Apollo would have theoretically set the United States Space Program back by decades.

Politicians would have been hard pressed to justify continued funding for NASA programs. “I don’t harbour any ill will towards NASA or the United States,” says Mr von Schmausen. “I do, on the other hand, believe that politicians are a deceitful breed, and conspiracies do exist, especially in agencies that suckle those politicians.”

Since the ‘success’ of Project Apollo, NASA has grown and prospered, mankind has regularly frolicked in a variety of craft in low Earth orbit (LEO) and robotic spacecraft have scoured our solar system and beyond.

Dietrich von Schmausen concludes however, that no humans have ventured beyond LEO – other than those who claim to have been sent to the Moon yet refuse to discuss the adventure candidly.

Aulis Online

This article has been challenged see NEXT Article

creative commons
This article is licensed under
a Creative Commons License




 

 

Andrew Corcoran

 

 


 



 

 


image